“Slavery and Race: Monticello Legacies” 2011-2012 James A. Thomas Lecture
23 March 12 01:36 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   

March 5, 2012
Annette Gordon-Reed, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School

Professor Annette Gordon-Reed delivered the 2011-2012 James A. Thomas Lecture on March 5, 2012, at Yale Law School. In her lecture – titled “Slavery and Race: Monticello Legacies” – Professor Gordon-Reed discusses the struggles implicit in Jefferson’s Monticello and their relationship to our national identity and ideals.

Gordon-Reed is Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, Professor of History in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Her epic work, The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family, received the 2009 Pulitzer Prize in History, as well as the 2008 National Book Award for Non-Fiction, as well as some twelve other awards. Gordon-Reed was awarded a 2009 National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama and was named a MacArthur “Genius” Fellow in 2010. 

Interview: The Worker & Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic
23 March 12 01:30 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   

February 16, 2012
Michael Wishnie, William O. Douglas Clinical Professor of Law and Director, Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization
Muneer Ahmad, Clinical Professor of Law

In 2007, on the heels of a controversial decision by New Haven's Board of Aldermen to grant municipal identification cards to all residents of New Haven (regardless of immigration status), Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents conducted a series of immigration raids in New Haven, arresting dozens of Latino residents.
 
Since that day, students in Yale Law School's Worker & Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic have represented many of those arrested, filing Freedom of Information requests, federal and state lawsuits, and working on policy intervention in addition to representing those arrested in their immigration cases.
 
On February 14, 2012, the federal government agreed to settle a civil rights lawsuit that arose from those raids. The landmark settlement will include a payment of $350,000 to 11 of those arrested in the raids and immigration relief for the plaintiffs.
 
In this podcast, Yale Law School Professors Michael Wishnie and Muneer Ahmad talk about the clinic's involvement representing those arrested beginning in 2007 and continuing through the settlement.

“Gene Patents: Advancing Medicine or Capturing Humanity?” Sponsored by the Information Society Project
23 March 12 01:26 PM | tyson | 1 Comments   

February 14, 2012
Chris Hansen, attorney for the ACLU
Richard Marsh, General Counsel of Myriad Genetics
Rochelle Dreyfuss, Pauline Newman Professor of Law at NYU
Dr. Allen Bale, Director of the DNA Diagnostic Lab and Professor of Genetics at the Yale School of Medicine

On February 14, 2012, Yale Law School’s Information Society Project hosted the following panel discussion about gene patents at Yale Law School. Panelists included: Chris Hansen, attorney for the ACLU; Richard Marsh, General Counsel of Myriad Genetics; Rochelle Dreyfuss, Pauline Newman Professor of Law at NYU; and Dr. Allen Bale, Director of the DNA Diagnostic Lab and Professor of Genetics at the Yale School of Medicine. The panelists discussed whether human genes should be patentable. Is isolated DNA a "product of nature" or a "man-made invention?" Do gene patents on balance promote innovation or harm it?

“Climate Change in the Courts” panel discussion sponsored by The Yale Law Journal, ACS, Federalist Society, and YELA
23 March 12 01:22 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   

February 25, 2012
Professor Douglas Kysar (Yale Law School)
Professor Richard Epstein (Chicago/ NYU)
Professor Daniel Farber (Berkeley)
Benjamin Ewing

The following panel discussion on “Climate Change in the Courts” features Yale Law School Professor Douglas Kysar; Benjamin Ewing ’11; New York University School of Law Professor Richard Epstein; and Berkley Law Professor Daniel Farber, who debate the role of courts in responding to global warming.

“National Security Law, Lawyers and Lawyering in the Obama Administration.” Dean’s Lecture
09 March 12 01:18 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   

The Honorable Jeh Charles Johnson, General Counsel of the Department of Defense
February 22, 2012

Jeh Johnson delivered the following Dean’s Lecture at Yale Law School on Feb. 22, 2012. Johnson discussed lawyering in the Obama Administration in this lecture, titled “National Security Law, Lawyers and Lawyering in the Obama Administration.”

"Legality" – A book discussion with Professor Scott Shapiro
09 March 12 01:13 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   

Scott J. Shapiro, Professor of Law and Philosophy at Yale Law School discusses his book “Legality” in this talk, which took place on February 21, 2012. Yale Law School Professor Heather Gerken provides commentary.  Sponsored by the Lillian Goldman Law Library
Feb 21, 2012

“Ungoverned Territories or New Types of Rights and Authority?” 2012 Storrs Lecture (Part II)
09 March 12 01:11 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   

Saskia Sassen, Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology and co-chair of The Committee on Global Thought, Columbia University
January 31, 2012

In this, the second lecture in the two-part Storrs Lecture series of 2012, Professor Sassen discusses “Ungoverned Territories or New Types of Rights and Authority?”

“The Making of New Bordering Capabilities” 2012 Storrs Lecture (Part I)
09 March 12 01:07 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   

Saskia Sassen, Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology and co-chair of The Committee on Global Thought, Columbia University
January 30, 2012

 In this, the first lecture in the two-part Storrs Lecture series of 2012, Professor Sassen discusses “The Making of New Bordering Capabilities.”

“The Dictates of Justice: Essays on Law and Human Rights”
21 February 12 01:58 PM | tyson | 1 Comments   

Owen Fiss, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Law and Professorial Lecturer in Law
A Book Discussion, sponsored by the Lillian Goldman Law Library
February 1, 2012

In this discussion, Yale Law School Sterling Professsor Emeritus Owen Fiss reflects upon his time advising Argentinian President Raúl Alfonsín and his administration during the human rights trials that the country conducted in the mid 1980s.
From that experience, Professor Fiss came to see human rights as universal social ideals that are also deeply rooted in a country's processes of national self-determination.  In his talk, Professor Fiss explains how states engaging in the transition from dictatorship to democracy, like Argentina, can protect human rights through civil, not just criminal, proceedings.  Professor Fiss also takes on the human rights issues posed by the fight against terrorism in the post-9/11 era within the context of national law.

“Democracy, Expertise, Academic Freedom: a First Amendment Jurisprudence for the Modern State”
09 February 12 11:18 AM | tyson | (Comments Off)   

Robert C. Post ’77, Dean and Sol & Lillian Goldman Professor of Law
A book discussion with commentary by Professor Jack M. Balkin
Sponsored by the Lillian Goldman Law Library
February 7, 2012

In his new book, titled Democracy, Expertise, Academic Freedom: a First Amendment Jurisprudence for the Modern State, Yale Law School Dean Robert C. Post ’77 shows that the familiar understanding of the First Amendment, which stresses the "marketplace of ideas" and which holds that "everyone is entitled to an opinion," is inadequate to create and preserve the expert knowledge that is necessary for a modern democracy to thrive.
This book discussion took place on February 7, 2012, at Yale Law School.

A Talk with Jose Antonio Vargas
26 January 12 02:05 PM | tyson | 1 Comments   

Jose Antonio Vargas, journalist and founder of Define American
December 1, 2011

Jose Antonio Vargas is a journalist who has written substantial articles for noteworthy newspapers and magazines such as the Washington Post, the Huffington Post, and the New Yorker. In 2011, Vargas wrote an essay for The New York Times Sunday Magazine titled “My Life as an Undocumented Immigrant” in which he chronicled the years he has spent hiding his immigration status after learning as a teen that his green card was fake.

In 2011 Vargas founded Define American, a nonprofit that seeks to change the conversation on immigration reform.

Vargas spoke about his personal story and Define American at Yale Law School on December 1, 2011. The talk was sponsored by several Yale groups, including Yale Law School’s Asian Pacific American Law Students Association.

“Your Guantánamo Moment”
26 January 12 01:57 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   

P. Sabin Willett, Partner, Bingham McCutchen
October 24, 2011

 P. Sabin Willett, Partner at Bingham McCutchen, delivered the 2011-2012 Preiskel-Silverman Lecture, titled “Your Guantánamo Moment” on October 24, 2011. In this lecture, Willett discusses his own work trying to win freedom for Uighur prisoners seized during the Afghanistan War and held at Guantánamo Bay.

“The Judge Who Cried: Social and Economic Rights as Judicially Enforceable Fundamental Rights”
26 January 12 01:51 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   

Albie Sachs, former South Africa Constitutional Court Justice
September 21, 2011

Renowned human rights activist and former South Africa Constitutional Court Justice Albie Sachs delivered the Robert P. Anderson Memorial Fellowship Lecture at Yale Law School on September 21, 2011. The lecture, titled “The Judge Who Cried: Social and Economic Rights as Judicially Enforceable Fundamental Rights.”

In his talk, Justice Sachs reflects on the demand for housing made by South African activist Irene Grootboom and other evicted shack dwellers, and on the demand for anti-retroviral drugs made by HIV-positive women about to give birth. He addresses the question, “Can the Constitutional Court of South Africa grant constitutional remedies without intruding unduly on the legitimate spheres of decision-making by the legislature and executive?”

Lincoln’s Code: The Puzzling History of the Laws of War
04 March 11 02:51 PM | lisa.cook | (Comments Off)   

February 28, 2011

An expert in American legal history, John Fabian Witt joined Yale Law School in 2009. In this, his inaugural lecture as the Allen H. Duffy Class of 1960 Professor of Law, Witt discusses the puzzling history of the laws of wars, dating back to the time of the Civil War and the wartime instructions known as "Lieber's code."

Is Civility Important?
24 February 11 01:25 PM | lisa.cook | 1 Comments   

February 17, 2011

Yale Law School Professor Stephen L. Carter, author of "Civility: Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy," shares his thoughts on the issue of civility in politics in this lecture, sponsored by the Yale Law Democrats and Yale Law Republicans.

Carter is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Yale, where he has taught since 1982.  Among his courses are law and religion, the ethics of war, contracts, intellectual property, and professional responsibility.  Much of his work focuses on the creationof conditions for rational dialogue, while preserving a rich diversity of points of view, whether at home or in international affairs. 

Whatever Happened to Freedom of Association?
18 February 11 03:04 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
February 7, 2011

Stanford law professor Michael W. McConnell, an expert on freedom of speech and religion, delivered the 2011 Ralph Gregory Elliot Lecture on February 7, 2011, at Yale Law School.

McConnell is the Richard & Frances Mallery Professor and Director of the Constitutional Law Center at Stanford Law School, as well as Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He is a leading authority on freedom of speech and religion, the relation of individual rights to government structure, originalism, and various other aspects of constitutional history and constitutional law.

Before joining Stanford in 2009, McConnell served as a Circuit Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. He is the only full-time professor of law in the nation who has previously served as a federal appellate judge. He has argued 13 cases in the United States Supreme Court, most recently Christian Legal Society v. Martinez, in 2010.

Lessons from Two Decades of New Business Creation-From Satellite Television to Electric Cars
15 February 11 12:51 PM | lisa.cook | (Comments Off)   

January 31, 2011

Kevin R. Czinger '87, co-founder and strategic advisor to CODA Automotive has extensive experience operating start-up and growth companies. The following lecture, titled "Lessons from Two Decades of New Business Creation-From Satellite Television to Electric Cars" was delivered on January 31, 2011 as part of the Yale Symposium on Law and Management, which was co-sponsored by Yale Law School and the Yale School of Management.

Czinger previously served as president and CEO of CODA, an electric car and battery company headquartered in Santa Monica, California,where he oversaw the management and strategic direction of the company. Prior to CODA, he was a partner and managing director at Fortress Private Equity, an alternative asset management firm, and an entrepreneur-in-residence at Benchmark Capital. He also served as senior vice president, Operations and Finance, and chief financial officer of Webvan Group.

Prior to Webvan, Czinger was a managing director in the media and telecommunications group at Merrill Lynch and also served as the CEO of Volcano Entertainment, a record and music publishing company he founded. In the early 1990s, he was executive director and head of the media-banking group at Goldman Sachs International in London.
Czinger holds a B.A. from Yale College and a J.D. from Yale Law School.

Dignity, Voice, Story
02 February 11 02:34 PM | lisa.cook | (Comments Off)   

January 24, 2011

The following podcast is a recording of Jean Koh Peters’s inaugural lecture as the Sol Goldman Clinical Professor of Law. The lecture, titled “Dignity, Voice, Story,” touches upon Professor Peters’s work representing children and refugees and her approach to clinical law teaching.

An expert in children, families, and the law, Peters joined Yale Law School in 1989 as an associate clinical professor and supervising attorney for The Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization. She was named clinical professor in 1993 and was named the Sol Goldman Clinical Professor of Law in October 2009. She previously was an assistant clinical professor at Columbia Law School and associate director of Columbia’s Child Advocacy Clinic. Prior to that, she served as a staff attorney in the Juvenile Rights Division of the Legal Aid Society in New York City, after clerking for the late William P. Gray of the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.

Before Roe v. Wade: Voices that Shaped the Abortion Debate Before the Supreme Court’s Ruling
02 February 11 02:26 PM | lisa.cook | 1 Comments   

December 9, 2010

In this book discussion, Reva Siegel ’86, the Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Professor of Law and  Linda Greenhouse ’78 MSL, the Knight Distinguished Journalist-in-Residence, discuss their book, “Before Roe v. Wade: Voices that Shaped the Abortion Debate Before the Supreme Court’s Ruling.” Yale Law School Professor Jack M. Balkin provides an introduction and commentary to frame the discussion.

Vision, Values, and Environmental Law
02 February 11 02:23 PM | lisa.cook | (Comments Off)   

December 2, 2010
In this podcast, Joseph M.  Field ’55 Professor of Law Douglas Kysar speaks on his book "Regulating from Nowhere: Environmental Law and the Search for Objectivity." Following Kysar’s remarks, Robert Verchick, Gauthier-St. Martin Chair in Environmental Law, Loyola University New Orleans, discusses Facing Catastrophe: Environmental Action for a Post-Katrina World. These remarks were delivered on December 2, 2010 at Yale Law School.

Reflections on Promoting Liberty and the Rule of Law, and the Curious Case of DADT
02 February 11 02:19 PM | lisa.cook | (Comments Off)   

Lecture sponsored by the Yale chapter of the American Constitution Society
December 1, 2010
Professor Dawn Johnsen ’86, former acting assistant attorney general under President Clinton and two-time President Obama nominee to head the DOJ Office of Legal Counsel, spoke at Yale Law School on December 1, 2010 about reproductive rights, torture, the military’s Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy, and the confirmation process, among other topics.

Climate Change, Courts, and the Common Law
02 February 11 02:17 PM | lisa.cook | (Comments Off)   

Inaugural Lecture - Douglas A. Kysar, Joseph M.  Field ’55 Professor of Law
November 15, 2010
Doug Kysar is a path-breaking scholar in the areas of environmental law and torts. His book "Regulating from Nowhere: Environmental Law and the Search for Objectivity" (Yale University Press 2010) seeks to reinvigorate environmental law and policy by offering novel theoretical insights on cost-benefit analysis, the precautionary principle, and
sustainable development. Professor Kysar is also the co-author of a leading casebook, The Torts Process (2007).
When asked about his Inaugural Lecture, Professor Kysar responded: “To date, scholars exploring the connection between climate change and tort law have tended to ask what the latter can do about the former. With a few notable exceptions, they have answered, ‘Not much.’ This lecture will pose the inverse question: What can climate change do about tort law? As it turns out, the answer is, ‘Quite a bit.’”

Hard Evidence on Soft Skills: The GED and the Problem of Soft Skills in America
02 February 11 02:08 PM | lisa.cook | 1 Comments   

The 2010 James A. Thomas Lecture
November 1, 2010
James Heckman, Henry Schultz Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago speaks on the topic of “Hard Evidence on Soft Skills: The GED and the Problem of Soft Skills in America.” 
Professor Heckman’s work has been devoted to the development of a scientific basis for economic policy evaluation, and his research has given policymakers important new insights into areas such as education, job training, the importance of accounting for general equilibrium in the analysis of labor markets, anti-discrimination law, and civil rights.  
In 2000, he won the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. He directs the Economics Research Center and the Center for Social Program Evaluation at the Harris School for Public Policy. In addition, he is the Professor of Science and Society in University College Dublin and a Senior Research Fellow at the American Bar Foundation.
Professor Heckman is author of hundreds of articles and several books, including, most recently, Global Perspectives on the Rule of Law and the forthcoming Hard Evidence on Soft Skills: The GED and the Problem of Soft Skills in America.

The Decline and Fall of the American Republic
02 February 11 02:00 PM | lisa.cook | 1 Comments   

October 20, 2010
Bruce Ackerman, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science, Yale Law School, discusses his new book, "The Decline and Fall of the American Republic," with Stephen Skowronek, Acting Chair of the Political Science department, Yale University.

Law and Morality in the Jewish Tradition
02 February 11 01:34 PM | lisa.cook | 1 Comments   
Dean's Lecture
October 5, 2010
Justice Izhak Englard (Ret.) Supreme Court of Israel
Izhak Englard, former justice of the Supreme Court of Israel, delivered this Dean’s Lecture at Yale Law School October 5, 2010. Justice Englard served on the Israeli Supreme Court from 1997 to 2003. He is the Bora Laskin Professor of Law (Emeritus) at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, where he was Dean of the Law Faculty from 1984 to 1987. He has served as visiting professor and lecturer at many universities, including Yale Law School, USC Law School, University of Rome, University of Zurich, University of Pennsylvania Law School, and Columbia Law School.
ACS Debate : Birthright Citizenship with Peter Schuck and Akhil Amar
30 September 10 03:37 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
September 22, 2010

On August 14, 2010, Peter Schuck, Yale Law School’s Simeon E. Baldwin Professor Emeritus of Law, opined in The New York Times that, even without a constitutional amendment, Congress can regulate citizenship of the children of undocumented immigrants.

That same week, Sterling Professor of Law Akhil Amar ’84 went on The Colbert Report to argue that the promise of equality under the 14th Amendment means that birthright citizenship allows no exception.

In the following debate, hosted by the American Constitution Society of Yale Law School and held on September 22, 2010, Professors Amar and Schuck discuss the history, the purpose, and ultimately the application of the 14th Amendment and birthright citizenship to the children of undocumented immigrants.
Federalist Society: Intellectual Property in the Age of Epidemics: Amy Kapczynski ‘03 and Richard Epstein
28 September 10 10:47 AM | tyson | 1 Comments   
Federalist Society Debate
September 16, 2010

In response to global epidemics such as HIV/AIDS, the Access to Knowledge Movement has emerged to challenge intellectual property protections as harmful to human rights and medical innovation. On September 16, 2010, Professor Richard Epstein ’68 from NYU School of Law and YLS Visiting Associate Professor Amy Kapczynski ’03 debated the need today to protect intellectual property, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry.
“Confronting the Seduction of Choice: Law, Education, and American Pluralism”
15 April 10 12:00 PM | tyson | 2 Comments   
Robert M. Cover Lecture in Law and Religion
March 22, 2010
Martha Minow '79, Dean and Jeremiah Smith Jr. Professor at Harvard Law School
Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow '79 spoke about law, education, and American pluralism in the 2010 Cover Lecture.
“Federalism All the Way Down?”
26 March 10 12:33 PM | gkp4 | 1 Comments   
J. Skelly Wright Inaugural Lecture
March 8, 2010
Heather Gerken, J. Skelly Wright Professor of Law
Professor Heather Gerken specializes in election law, constitutional law, and civil procedure. Professor Gerken is one of the country's leading experts on voting rights and election law, the role of groups in the democratic process, and the relationship between diversity and democracy. In her inaugural lecture as the J. Skelly Wright Professor of Law, Professor Gerken lectures on the topic “Federalism All the Way Down?”
“Citizens United and the Future of Campaign Finance Reform”
11 March 10 03:23 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
Sponsored by the American Constitution Society at Yale Law School
March 4, 2010
Samuel Issacharoff, Bonnie and Richard Reiss Professor of Constitutional Law, New York University School of Law
NYU election law professor Samuel Issacharoff ’83 speaks about the future of campaign finance reform after the Supreme Court's groundbreaking decision in Citizens United.
“The World’s Dream About Itself: The Story You Must Tell”
11 March 10 03:15 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
Dean’s Lecture
March 1, 2010 
Heidi Durrow ’95, author of The Girl Who Fell from the Sky, reads from her new book and talks about her path to becoming a writer.
The First Amendment Online
11 March 10 03:11 PM | tyson | 1 Comments   
February 22, 2010
Arianna Huffington, co-founder and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post
Arianna Huffington, co-founder and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post, spoke at Yale Law School on February 22, 2010. The lecture was part of the Liberty Tree First Amendment Online Colloquium, organized by Yale Law School’s Information Society Project and Law and Media Program. In this lecture, Huffington speaks about the future of journalism and the first amendment online – including topics such as net neutrality and citizen journalism.
Lecture organized by Yale Law School’s Information Society Project and Law and Media Program
A Question and Answer Session with Justice Stephen Breyer
05 March 10 09:09 AM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
February 16, 2010
The Honorable Stephen G. Breyer, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and Paul Gewirtz ’70, Potter Stewart Professor of Constitutional Law and Director, The China Law Center, Yale Law School
The Honorable Stephen G. Breyer, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court sat down for a question and answer interview with Yale Law School Professor Paul Gewirtz. Justice Breyer was visiting Yale Law School to deliver a two-part lecture series titled “Making the Constitution Work: A Supreme Court Justice’s View.”
“History: Challenges the Court Has Faced”
04 March 10 10:06 AM | tyson | 1 Comments   
Part One of a Two–Lecture Series on “Making the Constitution Work: A Supreme Court Justice’s View”
February 15, 2010
The Honorable Stephen G. Breyer, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court
This is the first lecture of a two-part lecture series in which Justice Breyer discusses key moments in the Supreme Court’s history that illustrate the importance of public acceptance of the Court’s decisions, as well as challenges the Court has faced in achieving such public acceptance. Justice Breyer shares his thoughts on what the Court must do in the future to make the Constitution work well in practice and to maintain the public trust it has earned.
“Future: Will the People Follow the Court?”
04 March 10 10:02 AM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
Part Two of a Two–Lecture Series on “Making the Constitution Work: A Supreme Court Justice’s View”
February 16, 2010
The Honorable Stephen G. Breyer, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court
This is the second lecture of a two-part lecture series in which Justice Breyer discusses key moments in the Supreme Court’s history that illustrate the importance of public acceptance of the Court’s decisions, as well as challenges the Court has faced in achieving such public acceptance. Justice Breyer shares his thoughts on what the Court must do in the future to make the Constitution work well in practice and to maintain the public trust it has earned.
“Law and Life in Asia, Part 3: Academic, Scholarly, and Law Reform Interaction with China”
04 March 10 09:58 AM | tyson | 1 Comments   
Dean's Distinguished Lectures
February 23, 2010
Jerome A. Cohen ’55, Professor and Co-director of the U.S.-Asia Law Institute at New York University Law School, adjunct senior fellow for Asian Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.
Jerome A. Cohen speaks about his personal experiences in East Asia and about the role of law and politics in China’s development.  This is the final lecture in a three-part lecture series.
| Article |
“Law and Life in Asia, Part 2: “Lawyering to Foster China’s Economic and Legal Development”
04 March 10 09:51 AM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
Dean's Distinguished Lectures
February 9, 2010
Jerome A. Cohen ’55, Professor and Co-director of the U.S.-Asia Law Institute at New York University Law School, adjunct senior fellow for Asian Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.
Jerome A. Cohen speaks about his personal experiences in East Asia and about the role of law and politics in China’s development.  This is the second lecture in a three-part lecture series.
| Article |
“Beyond Recognition”
15 February 10 01:45 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
The James A. Thomas Lecture
February 8, 2010
Dean Spade, Assistant Professor of Law, Seattle University
Professor Spade talks about the limitations of current popular legal equality demands emerging under the “trans rights” framework. Taking up some of the interventions of Critical Race Theory and women of color feminism as well as Michel Foucault's concept of biopolitics, he examines some of the pitfalls of law reform-centered social movement strategies and suggests alternative frameworks for imagining a critical trans politics."
Attachment(s): YLSThomasSpade020810.mp3
"Law and Life in Asia, Part 1: Taiwan's Rule of Law Development."
05 February 10 02:26 PM | gkp4 | (Comments Off)   
Dean's Distinguished Lectures
February 2, 2010
Jerome A. Cohen ’55, Professor and Co-director of the U.S.-Asia Law Institute at New York University Law School, adjunct senior fellow for Asian Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.
Jerome A. Cohen speaks about his personal experiences in East Asia and about the role of law and politics in China’s development. He explains the significance of Taiwan for leaning about the mainland of China. | Article |
"The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law"
27 January 10 02:16 PM | gkp4 | 1 Comments   
Dean's Lecture
January 26, 2010
Albie Sachs, former South Africa Constitutional Court Justice
A chief architect of South Africa’s post-apartheid Constitution, Justice Sachs was appointed by Nelson Mandela in 1994 to serve on the country’s newly established Constitutional Court, where he served until his retirement in 2009. The appointment followed decades of anti-apartheid activism, during which Sachs was raided by the security police, subjected to banning orders restricting his movement, and twice detained in solitary confinement without trial for prolonged periods. He eventually went into exile, spending eleven years studying and teaching law in England and another eleven years in Mozambique, where he worked as a law professor and legal researcher. In 1988, he was the target of a car bombing by South African security agents, which cost him his right arm and sight in one eye.

His newest book, The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law, was published by Oxford University Press in August 2009.
"Child Soldiers, Justice, and the International Legal Imagination"
30 October 09 01:56 PM | gkp4 | 1 Comments   
Human Rights Workshop, Schell Center for International Human Rights
October 29, 2009
Mark A. Drumbl, Professor and Director of the Transnational Law Institute at Washington & Lee University, School of Law
Mark A. Drumbl, Professor and Director of the Transnational Law Institute at Washington & Lee University, School of Law discusses "Child Soldiers, Justice, and the International Legal Imagination" as part of a Human Rights Workshop sponsored by the Schell Center for International Human Rights.
“Predatory Protections, Tragic Tradeoffs, and Dangerous Liaisons: Dilemmas of Justice in the Context of Capitalist Crisis”
07 October 09 01:44 PM | gkp4 | (Comments Off)   
The 2009 Storrs Lectures
October 6, 2009
Nancy Fraser, Henry A. and Louise Loeb Professor of Philosophy and Politics at The New School for Social Research
The Storrs Lectures, one of Yale Law School's oldest and most prestigious lecture programs, were established in 1889. These annual lectures are given by a prominent scholar and deal with fundamental problems of law and jurisprudence.
“Marketization, Social Protection, Emancipation: Toward a Neo-Polanyian Conception of Capitalist Crisis”
06 October 09 01:30 PM | gkp4 | (Comments Off)   
The 2009 Storrs Lectures
October 5, 2009
Nancy Fraser, Henry A. and Louise Loeb Professor of Philosophy and Politics at The New School for Social Research
The Storrs Lectures, one of Yale Law School's oldest and most prestigious lecture programs, were established in 1889. These annual lectures are given by a prominent scholar and deal with fundamental problems of law and jurisprudence.
Heather Gerken on her book, "The Democracy Index: Why our Election System is Failing and How to Fix It."
15 April 09 08:48 AM | tyson | 1 Comments   
April 2, 2009
Heather Gerken, J. Skelly Wright Professor of Law
Heather Gerken discusses her new book The Democracy Index: Why our Election System is Failing and How to Fix It, in which she proposes a ranking system that would rate the performance of state and local election systems.
The Hon. Louise Arbour delivers the 2008-09 Judge Jon O. Newman Lecture on Global Justice
13 April 09 09:13 AM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
The Hon. Louise Arbour, former United Nations High Commissioner of Human Rights
March 23, 2009
In the 2008-09 Judge Jon O. Newman Lecture on Global Justice, the Honorable Louise Arbour spoke on "Peace and Justice: A framework for Co-existence".
Professor Bob Ellickson on his book, "The Household: Informal Order Around the Hearth"
17 February 09 12:10 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
February 12, 2009
Robert Ellickson, Walter E. Meyer Professor of Property and Urban Law
In this episode we speak with Walter E. Meyer Professor of Property and Urban Law Robert Ellickson, the author of The Household: Informal Order Around the Hearth.  In his new book, Professor Ellickson explores the internal dynamics of the home. Professor Ellickson applies transaction cost economics, sociological theory, and legal analysis as he examines how the home is ordered. The Household illustrates how households are formed and how they choose to govern themselves.
Filed under: ,
Peacekeeping: Testing the Limits of the Concept of an International Community
21 January 09 02:20 PM | tyson | 1 Comments   
December 8, 2008
Jean-Marie Guehenno, 2000-2008 Undersecretary General for Peacekeeping Operations at the UN
UN Undersecretary General Guehenno discusses global conflicts during his tenure.
Daniel Markovits '00 on his book, "A Modern Legal Ethics"
12 January 09 11:21 AM | tyson | 1 Comments   
December 10, 2008
Daniel Markovits '00, Professor of Law, Yale Law School
Professor Markovits discusses his new book, "A Modern Legal Ethics: Adversary Advocacy in a Democratic Age," in which he proposes a wholesale renovation of legal ethics.
Filed under: ,
Attachment(s): DMarkovitz121008.mp3
“Re-Envisioning the Civil Rights Movement: Courts, Communities, and Legal Liberalism,” the James A. Thomas Lecture at Yale Law School
25 November 08 08:12 AM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
November 3, 2008
Tomiko Brown-Nagin, Professor of Law and History, University of Virginia
Virginia law and history professor Tomiko Brown-Nagin ’97 discusses what the civil rights movement might have looked like if legal historians had been able to construct the movement from the ground up.
Bob Solomon on the mortgage foreclosure crisis
11 November 08 05:29 PM | tyson | (Comments Off)   
November 7, 2008
Bob Solomon, Clinical Professor of Law and Supervising Attorney and Director of Clinical Studies
Yale Law School Clinical Professor Bob Solomon, director of the School’s clinical programs and an expert in housing law, explains the mortgage foreclosure crisis.
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